Does Homer work? Where's the proof?

The Apple App Store is flooded with literacy apps aimed at parents that claim to teach your child how to read, but none—seriously, none—have been willing to put those promises to the test. So, what’s going on?

Blind studies are often too risky for the companies behind them. Remember, when the results roll in, companies have to live with those oh-so-public results, whether they like them or not. Next time you come across one of those empty claims that a program is "proven to work," try to find the evidence! It's simply not there.

We took the risk.

When Dr. Susan Neuman, an NYU professor and former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education, approached our small team about using Homer to conduct a formal study on whether iPad apps can really help children learn to read, we said yes. We believe in our product, and we want our wonderful users to rest easy knowing our reading program really works.

The results are in.

Homer was used in preschool classrooms in Brooklyn for just 15 minutes a day for a period of 6 weeks. At the end of the blind study, the students who used Homer showed significant improvements in print knowledge, phonological awareness, and letter sounds. While their peers lost ground over the course of the summer study, the children using Homer nearly doubled their scores.


Was this article helpful?
1 out of 1 found this helpful Have more questions? Submit a request